The Comic Book Bin Keeps Your Comics Upright

To store comic books and keep them safe, most collectors place each comic in an archival-safe bag along with a firm backing board to support the comic and protect the edges. The collection is then placed in a “short box”, holding about 150 bagged and boarded comics.

Storing comics has always had a challenge keeping the comics upright when the box is not full. If the is box is completely full, there’s no problem as the comics naturally keep themselves upright with the ends of the box supporting them. However, if the box is only partially full, the comics can topple over like a row of books without a bookend. Collectors can easily solve this problem by placing some comics sideways in the box or using another object as a bookend inside the box. Nonetheless, this issue has always been annoying to collectors.

The BCW Comic Book Bin solves this problem by keeping a partial collection upright at all times. The Bin is made from molded polypropylene panels that are snapped together (see the the second video below). This manufacturing process allows the Bin to have several features not possible with the traditional cardboard short comic box. The Bin uses special Comic Bin Partitions that fit into evenly spaced notches. The Comic Book Bin comes with one Partition. This Partition is movable, so you can use it as a bookend to keep a small collection of comics upright. As your collection grows, you can shift the Partition to the next slot, and so on, until your Comic Book Bin is full. If you want to fill all of the available slots with a Partition, packs of 3 extra Partitions can be purchased separately.

While you may find the Comic Book Bin assembled at your local comic shop, they are normally unassembled, coming in five panels and one partition. The panels snap together to make a sturdy bin. Please review the video below to see the simplest sequence to assemble the Bin.

The Comic Book Bin was designed to hold Current and Silver Age comic books in bags and boards. This includes Current and Silver BCW Archivals (Mylar bags) that are wider than normal polypropylene comic bags. The Bin is also large enough to hold Current or Silver Comic Book Toploaders. BCW Comic Book Dividers also fit under the lid.

Golden Age comics and graded comic books are too large for the Comic Book Bin. While BCW is considering making a Graded Comic Bin, our cardboard Graded Comic Boxes are our best solution for CGC/CBCS slabs at this time. We are also considering a Long Comic Book Bin, but at this time our cardboard Long Comic Boxes or corrugated plastic Long Comic Book Boxes are our best options. For magazines or Golden Age comics, our cardboard Magazine Box is BCW’s best storage solution. If you want to lobby for other products, or suggest product improvements, please comment below. We’re listening!

BCW Box Folding Demos

BCW offers a wide variety of boxes to store your comic books, gaming cards, sports cards, card holders, records, and other media such as video games and dvds. If you have never folded one of these boxes on your own, the first time you fold them can be somewhat confusing. Since there may be some question about the proper way to fold these boxes, we have created videos for each one of our boxes, which includes information about what the boxes store and how to fold them. If you are having trouble folding these boxes or aren’t sure which box you need, check out these videos:

Trading Card Boxes

100 Count Storage Box (1-BX-100)

200 Count Storage Box (1-BX-200)

300 Count Storage Box (1-BX-300)

330 Count Storage Box (1-BX-330)

400 Count Storage Box (1-BX-400)

500 Count Storage Box (1-BX-500)

550 Count Storage Box (1-BX-550)

660 Count Storage Box (1-BX-660)

800 Count Storage Box (1-BX-800)

800 Count Storage Box – 2 Piece (1-BX-802)

930 Count Storage Box (1-BX-930)

Graded Trading Card Box (1-BX-GTCB)

Vault Storage Box (1-BX-VAULT)

Super Vault Storage Box (1-BX-SVAULT)

Shoe Storage Box (1-BX-SHOE)

Graded Shoe Storage Box (1-BX-GSB)

Super Shoe Storage Box (1-BX-SSHOE)

Sorting Tray Storage Box (1-BX-SORT)

3200 Count Storage Box (1-BX-3200)

Monster Storage Box (1-BX-MON)

5000 Count Storage Box (1-BX-5000)

Super Monster Storage Box (1-BX-SMON)

Trading Card Houses

Card House Storage Box (1-BX-HOUSE)

Shoe Box House (1-BX-SHOE-HOUSE)

Comic Book Boxes

Comic Book Shipper (1-BX-FLAT-11X7X1)

Short Comic Storage Box (1-BX-SHORT)

Long Comic Storage Box (1-BX-LONG)

Graded Comic Storage Box (1-BX-GCB)

Comic Book Houses

Short Comic House (1-BX-SHORT-HOUSE)

Long Comic House (1-BX-LONG-HOUSE)

Record Boxes

33 RPM Vinyl Storage Box (1-BX-33RPM-BOX)

45 RPM Vinyl Storage Box (1-BX-45RPM-BOX)

Other Storage Boxes

Media Storage Box (1-BX-MEDIA)

Magazine Storage Box (1-BX-MAGBOX)

Post Card Storage Box (1-BX-PCBOX)

Why do BCW Card Box Names Not Match the Amount of Cards They Can Hold?

BCW offers numerous sizes of boxes to store collectible trading cards. The boxes are named by numbers, implying they can store that many cards. An example is the BCW 930 Count Box – its title implies it holds 930 cards, however the description claims it holds 825 cards. So why do BCW box names not match what the boxes actually hold? Is there a system to help collectors understand the box naming system vs. the actual box quantity amount?

This is a frequently asked question at BCW Supplies. To understand the answer, a brief history lesson in baseball card collecting is needed. Between 1956 and 1981, Topps was the only manufacturer of baseball cards and they used an 18 point card stock. In 1981, the MLB added 2 more licensees which were Donruss and Fleer. By 1989, The Upper Deck Company, Score, and other brands started emerging. With competition came innovation and card companies started making cards with a little heavier card stock and UV coating which made them a couple of points thicker. One manufacturer of football cards, Action Packed, even started embossing their cards. Then, the card manufacturers started making thicker “premium brands” of trading cards and adding pieces of memorabilia to some of the special cards, usually referred to as inserts.

So, the answer is that, for the period between 1956 and 1989, cards were approximately 18 points thick and the boxes were originally designed for these cards.

See all of the BCW Trading Card Boxes. Please refer to the product description to ensure the box you need with protect all of the cards you are storing.

The bottom of most BCW boxes list their size.

The bottom of most BCW boxes describes their size.